CDM 101 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Images, Sounds, Cultures I
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
CDM 101
Fall/Spring
2
2
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to change the way students look at the visual world that surrounds them. It will help students to develop an understanding of the ways in which meaning is produced in visual culture. The course will center on the following questions: How do we make meaning of the audio-visual world? In what ways do economics, politics, culture affect visual representation? How do the ways in which visual culture is produced, consumed, distributed, and interpreted, play into the images we encounter every day? What is the relationship between images and power relations?
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define contemporary visual culture
  • explain how viewers make meaning of images
  • argue with the basic concepts of visual culture
  • analyze images in their economic, social, political and cultural contexts
  • apply methods of visual cultural analysis to images
  • identify how images circulate through the social field
  • discuss the politics of visual representation
Course Content The course reviews images ranging from newspapers to the Web, advertisements to the movies, from television to fine arts and discusses cultural products in their economic, social, political and cultural contexts. The course will be held in interactive lecture form. Students are expected to participate in class discussion. There will be in-class screening of videos related to the topics covered. Evaluation will be based on five take-home assignments.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction. Basic concepts Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press. Pp. 9-16.
2 What is visual culture? Images, power, politics. Screening Episode 1, Ways of Seeing, John Berger (BBC TV series, 1972) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pDE4VX_9Kk John Berger, Ways of Seeing, Penguin, 1972. Pp. 7-33 (Chapter 1). Michel Foucault “Las Meninas” Chapter 1 in The Order of Things: An Archeology of Human Sciences (Les Mots et les choses) pp. 3-16.
3 What is representation? Representation and the Media Screening: Stuart Hall, Representation and the Media (MEF, 1997) Stuart Hall (Ed) 1997. Representation. Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. Sage Publications. Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press. Pp. 16-22.
4 Ways of Seeing, Practices of Looking Renaissance perspective and other ways of seeing Screening A Day on the Grand Canal With the Emperor of China. “Surface is Illusion, But so is Depth.” 1988. Director: Philip Haas. Writernarrator: David Hockney Art, Aura, Authenticity Assignment 1 (Representation) due Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press. Pp. 151-157. Walter Benjamin (1936) “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” in Illuminations. Pp. 211-244.
5 Semiotics - Assignment 2 (Ways of Seeing) due Roland Barthes (1977) “Rhetoric of the image” Image - Music - Text. Hill and Wang, pp.32-51.
6 Mythologies Roland Barthes “The Eiffel Tower” in The Eiffel Tower and Other Mythologies. University of California Press. pp. 3-17
7 Stereotypes Ideology Screening Reel Bad Arabs (MEF, 2006) Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 22-26.
8 Orientalism Screening Edward Said on Orientalism (MEF, 1998) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v= fVC8EYd_Z_g Assignment 3 (Stereotypes) due Edward Said. 1977. “Imaginative geography and the its representations: Orientalizing the Oriental” in Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient. Penguin Books. Pp. 49-72.
9 Culture Culture Industry Screening Money for Nothing (MEF, 2001) Assignment 4 (Orientalism) due Raymond Williams. 1976. “Culture” in Keywords, Oxford University Press. pp. 87-93. Theodor Adorno & Max Horkheimer. “The Culture Industry. Enlightenment as mass deception” in Gunzelin Schmid Noerr (Ed). 2009. Dialectic of enlightenment: philosophical fragments. Stanford Univ. Press. Pp. 41-72.
10 Identity Otherness Bell Hooks (2015) “eating the other. desire and resistance” in Black Looks. Race and Representation. Routledge. Pp. 21-40.
11 Gender Codes Screenings Codes of Gender (MEF, 2010) Episode 2, Ways of Seeing, John Berger (BBC TV series, 1972) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1GI8mNU5Sg John Berger “Chapter 2” in Ways of Seeing. 1972.
12 Identification Assignment 5 (Gender Codes) due Review Interactive Exhibition on MoMA website: https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2012/cindys herman/gallery/2/mobile.php
13 Viewers Make Meaning Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press. Pp. 49-91.
14 Overview
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Textbooks
References

Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright. 2009. Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
80
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
6
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
4
64
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
5
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
162

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to use the advanced theoretical and practical knowledge that the graduates have acquired in the areas of political science and international relations.

2

To be able to examine, interpret data and assess concepts and ideas with the scientific methods in the areas of political science and international relations

3

To take the responsibility as a group team member and as an individual to solve unforeseen and multi-dimensional problems that are unforeseen in practice

4

To be able to recognize regional and global issues/problems, and to be able to develop solutions based on research and scientific evidence

5

To be able to assess the acquired knowledge and skills in the areas of political science and international relations critically and to detect learning requirements and to guide learning.

6

To be able to inform authorities and institutions in the area of international relations; to be able to transfer ideas and proposals supported by quantitative and qualitative data about the problems verbally and in writing to experts and non-experts

7

To be able to interpret theoretical debates regarding relations among factors in global politics such as structures, institutions and culture, to be able to pinpoint the continuities and changes of main dynamics of international relations.

8 To be able to distinguish the differences between the classical and contemporary theories and to assess their relationship,
9

To be able to make use of other disciplines which contribute to political science and international relations (law, economics, sociology, psychology, etc.) and to have the basic knowledge of these disciplines.

10

To be able to keep abreast of current news on political science and international relations, learn a foreign language and to communicate with one’s peers (European language portfolio global scale, level B1).

11

To be able to speak a second foreign at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

12

To have ethical, social and scientific values in the stages throughout the processes of collecting, interpreting, disseminating and implementing data related to political science and international relations.

13

To be able to improve the acquired knowledge, skills and qualifications for personal and social reasons.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest